DOTLOGICS BLOG

April 24, 2017

5 Mistakes You Should Avoid When Designing Your SaaS App

Written byRobby Schlesinger


Many SaaS companies fail, not because their products aren’t innovative or useful, but because the design of their user interface is too complicated or doesn’t meet the expectations of their users. Consumers expect utility from their apps, but they also expect a user friendly experience that makes the app engaging and easy to user. Since many early-stage SaaS companies don’t hire for professional website design capabilities, they struggle to develop an easy-to-use design that will attract and retain their users. Here are five mistakes you should avoid when designing your SaaS app.

1. Making the registration page too complicated.
Today’s users are savvy enough to understand that by handing over their personal information, they’re opening themselves to solicitation emails and possible fees. A registration page asking for too much information from the user can deter them from interacting with your SaaS app further. What’s more, a long registration page never looks too friendly to the eye, and that alone can put them off.

2. Giving the user too many options.
Flexible features can add a lot of value to a SaaS app. But if the user is presented with too many configuration and customization options, it can hurt the aesthetic of your app and frustrate your users. If a user can’t easily find the utility of your app, they will be unlikely to subscribe to its service.



3. Making features too complicated.
It’s normal for there to be a slight learning curve when working with a new app; a few on screen tutorials and help videos can go a long way in helping a user better understand the value proposition your app offers. But if the features are made too complicated, users will never intuitively understand the benefit of your app and will likely stop using it.

4. Not optimizing for mobile.
Data-driven SaaS apps with intricately designed dashboards look wonderful on a full size screen, but what about on tablets and smartphones? Most users are going to traffic an app on their mobile devices, and without a user interface that looks good on smaller screens, users will find a poor quality user experience and stop using your app, maybe even going so far as to give a bad review and deter others from using it.

5. Not optimizing load times.
Similar to poor mobile design, optimization of large assets like high resolution images, videos, and animations can dramatically slow the load time required to render your app through cellular data. If users experience sluggish wait times, they’ll stop using your app if only to save on battery life.
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